Tag Archives: website

4 Tips of Desktop-First Design for Responsive Websites

responsive website

Nowadays, where all attention is in mobile-first design, desktop-first design seems less popular. This is because many designers aim to create responsive design. However, starting from desktop is not the bad. In fact, this design works better if you want to create feature-rich designs. This workflow may not as popular as mobile-first design, but as a web designer, you should know why you also need to put attention on desktop-first design.

The Benefits of Desktop-First
Generally, desktop first is something that everyone made websites up until the responsive era. Today, with so many people talk about mobile first, there are still so many reasons why we have to stick with the desktop approach, especially if you want your site have tons of detailed features on larger screens.

Here are some benefits of the desktop-first ideologies.

  • You get to see all major features at once
  • It lets you imagine all the largest possibilities for your design first
  • It’s the best strategy if your audience mostly uses desktops/laptops

You must think that any modern websites like Twitter puts mobile-first design. However, even Twitter have lots of extra features that come along with the desktop experience. Therefore, you need to create feature-rich websites that depend on a strong desktop design. This is perhaps the biggest benefit of a desktop-first layout. You get to see the site as it should look with all of its accessories. These extras can be removed for smaller screens as you test and find certain features just don’t carry over well.

It’s easy to consider dynamic features more like an afterthought with a mobile-first approach. But, you’re treating these features as the primary display method with a desktop-first approach, then choosing to remove them as needed.

No one is better than other, so you can try both of them to see what you prefer. Working from smaller area or starting from desktop then working smaller.

Supporting All Browsers

Handling browser support is the trickiest part of desktop-first design. In fact, it is reasonable for all mobile browsers to basically support the same features as desktop browsers. The main difference can be seen not in HTML/CSS support, but rather in touch-based support.

So, it is important to consider how the different browsers work, what they support, and how to handle the user’s touch-based input when moving from desktop to mobile. A few good rules to consider while scaling down your desktop-first design:

  • Increase body text size so links are easier to tap
  • Make tappable elements larger
  • Add JavaScript libraries that support swipe motions

Graceful Degradation
Graceful degradation is a process that builds all your website’s top features with everything you want on the site, and then if other browsers can’t support them you revert to fallback methods. A common example of this tactic is the removal of dropdown sliding menus for mobile. However, rather a change in user experience, this isn’t strictly graceful degradation. On the other hand, you’re searching for JS functions or CSS3 properties that literally cannot be supported in a certain browser.

When Desktop Takes Priority
After all, you can think about designing a site where desktop takes priority over mobile. If the mobile experience can be incredibly simple but the desktop experience needs to be detailed and dynamic. But, you also should have a plan for the mobile site with at least a vague idea in mind of how it’ll look.

 

3 Techniques on How to Optimize Your Website for Multiple Keywords

How-to-Optimize-Your-Website-for-Multiple-Keywords

With so many updates, nowadays SEO puts more priority on context. This makes context is above keywords. But, this doesn’t mean that you will neglect keywords relevancy and authority. Therefore, as a SEO engineer who works for SEO service, you have to understand and combine what Google wants and what users want.

If you assume that Google will understand the context of your content while you build a strong brand and positive user experience, you will still have to consider about the hierarchy of your content, how to organize it, and how to build context that can rank for multiple keywords, so that it will meet your conversion goals. Below are several tips on how to optimize and focus on keywords.

  1. Know Your Current Content

After determining your conversion goals, you may need to set your analytics house, and conducted keyword research, then you’re ready to organize your keyword data into meaningful topics. Instead of stemming or use all of the literal variations of the terms and its plural or singular versions, you can find sets of terms on the same topic and group them together.

Usually we often fall into the most general topics of the niche or industry when running an e-commerce site. Most B2B sites follow a pattern as well with top-level business industry terms, product or service categories and the products or service themselves.

As keywords grouped into topics, so it is possible to take the important next step of mapping your keywords to existing pages of content or conducting a content audit. As the first step you can run a crawl of the existing site structure with screaming Frog, download the HTML page results into Excel, and then get to work putting topics and terms out to the side of specific pages.

When you know you have content gaps and need to create more, that’s when you can turn around and quickly search to see which websites own the top of the SERPs for those topics and draw inspiration (without copying them) for ways to fill the gaps with your own content and draw inspiration for ways to fill the gaps with your own content and make decisions based on priority.

  1. Optimize Site Architecture

Even though, you can start once you know where you stand with content, then having a plan for filling gaps but first you need to figure out how to organize the content. This means balancing user experience, with product/service offerings and topical keyword search volume. Moreover, build out your site hierarchy working top to bottom going from most general to most specific. Even though, mostly sites are already built this way. However, site navigation and structure is often dictated by an internal or organizational view when SEO isn’t involved.

Besides, you are able to cast a wider net in terms of rankings and visibility, by taking an approach that looks at essentially any page at any level on the site as an entrance point and landing page for one or more topical keywords. In fact, all of your efforts will destruct your message, when you try to rank for too many terms with a single page or section of the site.

  1. Do Your On-Page Optimization

It is surprising that there are so many SEO campaigns that neglected the basics of on-page optimization. In fact, these SEO basics still apply. However, you need to look at it deeper than just trying to merely produce content and organize it well top to bottom in the site. Besides, you need to ensure proper categorization, when you’re building context for the user and Google. Another power in the on-page variables is having all factors working together with architecture and on-page optimization.

4 Mantras for Designing Scalable APIs

4 Mantras for Designing Scalable APIs - YWF

The idea of scalability is often offered with a great selling point. For instance, you may be familiar with these tags, “Make your API scalable by tying into our simple API” or “you too can make your service scalable by licensing our endpoint collating system”. These are common sales pitches, but they’re tying into a magic service to make scalability happen, as a web developer, you are likely not being scalable – there’s no silver bullet, and adopting a quick fix doesn’t address underlying architectural deficiencies. Generally, scalable can be defined into 4 big definitions:

  • Extensible: At most basic level, scalable software is extensible. Instead of limiting the functionality, it allows multiple avenues to tie into the underlying services and systems to enable extensions and other services. Amazon’s API Gateway is one of the examples.
  • Built into the Architecture: Scalability can’t be separated from the API itself. So, to make it simple, please build for scalability from the onset. In fact, you can use third party to increase your scalability, especially when they assist a built-to-scale approach.
  • Implies Demand Balancing: As its name, “scale”, you can manage one hundred requests as with one million. However, scalability demands efficient performance, regardless of technique or methodology, both at extremely high traffic and extremely low traffic.
  1. Design for a Repeating Launch Day

Launching a product can be really stressful, you may have prepared for everything, but you simply cannot know the requirements your system might see. For instance when launching a service, what kind of traffic can we expect? Let’s say we’re launching a new social platform that ties into an API to handle 200k calls an hour but the rate has surpassed to several millions of calls. This means that you need to address the foundation of your API as if you are always on the verge launching. Besides, you may need to use load balancer as it can determine between your success and failure. Moreover, having failover paths and secondary functions will produce you to a huge difference towards user experience.

The last important thing is to integrate analytics into your system. By knowing trends developing in real time will help you develop in an agile way and address deficiencies as they arise organically, while predicting further failures down the road.

  1. Anticipate Success

No one will truly know how successful you’re actually going to be. This is because it’s not a simple consideration of traffic, either – traffic might be high even if you’re the second or third most popular choice. Therefore, a provider will plan for the most extreme case possible as he doesn’t know how much traffic they can expect. Another way to frame this would be to anticipate success.

  1. Non-Extensible is a Unitasker

If your application is not extensible, traffic management and scalable mindset is nothing. While extensibility is indeed its own concept, with its own considerations and implications, whether or not a service is extensible can have a direct impact on whether or not it’s scalable. In the end, there is no way that a provider can know literally every possible future use and application of their service while it’s a great practice to develop with scalablity from the onset.

  1. Efficiency is King

You will face so many complexities within your problem, so it is important to know how to simplify your API architecture and thus simplify the resultant solution applied to the problem. In fact, you can drastically reduce the actual resources needed by an application by increasing efficiency.