Tag Archives: website

Why UI Changes Annoy People and How to Handle It

When it comes to designing for good user interfaces, especially for website design interfaces, there are so many reading patterns that you can apply. Each pattern has their own knowledge of how people perceive visual information and theory of how to improve user experience while reading or observing content. Among so many theories, there are three patterns that gain the most popularity. They are the Gutenberg Diagram, the F-pattern, and the Z-pattern. If you are a web designer, we  highly recommend this article for you!

The Gutenberg Diagram
This theory reflects the western culture of reading which is top to bottom and left to right.

image 1 for UI changes

From the diagram above, we can see that there are four quadrants. For key contents like a headline and a logo, you’d better place it in the top left quadrant. Then, you can place logical conclusion in the bottom right quadrant in the bottom quadrant. Therefore, it is recommended to put a CTA (call-to-action) in this section in the form of text, a video, or a link.

The F-Pattern
In F-pattern, people start engaging with content by moving their eyes in a horizontal line. Then, they scan a vertical line trying to find the points they’re interested in. Then, they will continue what they’re looking for after scanning the content horizontally.

image 2 for UI changes

 

You can use elements like bullet, points, typography, colored buttons, and highlighted texts and so on to improve the user experience. These elements give visual weight to the interface and indicate important points.

The Z-Pattern
Many people consider Z-pattern as the king of landing pages since it covers important aspects including visual hierarchy, content structure, and CTAs. Different from F-pattern, which is more suitable for text- or content-heavy page, the Z-pattern efficiently grasps users’ attention on landing pages with minimal copy. Here is an image of Z-pattern.

image 3 for UI changes

You can follow the structure below when designing with the Z-pattern:

  1. A top horizontal line should include catchy contents and elements like the logo and navigation bar (so users can quickly access the website’s pages).
  2. Following a classic storytelling approach, a diagonal line should introduce users to the main content including the main copy, attention-grabbing images, slideshows, and so on.
  3. Finally, a lower horizontal line should feature a CTA that stimulates users to perform a certain action such as signing up, subscribing, or making a purchase.

How to Prevent User Dissatisfaction with Interface Changes

Since everyone is unique,  we cannot determine which pattern that might suit your users. To know what kind of pattern that might suit your readers; you can apply the following methods to evaluate the design and functionality of a new or an existing system with real users. Here are some of the methods:

A/B Testing
Comparing two different concepts is called as A/B testing or split testing. In A/B testing, you can compare buttons, CTAs, color schemes, and banners. The aim of A/B testing is to figure out which of various options is the most successful, for instance, which button gets the most clicks. Each case of A/B testing is unique. What elements you test depends on your business goals. However,  the following elements are generally tested:

  • Copy (product descriptions, button text, etc.)
  • Calls-to-action (for example, their placement or wording)
  • Application forms
  • Layouts
  • Images
  • Color Schemes

Bear in mind that in order to get relevant results, the A/B testing should be performed simultaneously. Besides, doing A/B tests will avoid you from audience backlash and can even help you achieve better conversion rates by making necessary tweaks to an interface.

Hallway Testing
If you are looking for an informal way, the hallway testing is the answer. It involves going to a crowded area and simply asking passers-by to test and evaluate an interface. For example, you may go to local Starbucks and do little interviews with strangers in that cozy place. You can also apply this method with your office colleagues. Therefore, to conduct testing successfully, you can plan everything in advance.

By performing this method, you can figure out what elements of an interface puzzle users and how your users conceive the system as a whole.

Five-Second Testing
The main purpose of 5-second testing is to elicit the user’s first impressions to an interface and discover whether a website or an app communicates its purpose to its visitors. In 5-seconds, they have to view an interface and try to remember as much as possible. Then, they will be given some questions regarding the sense of their reactions.

Through 5-second observing, you can generally aim at evaluating a visual UI component rather than the whole interface.

Conclusion
Even though the changes of UI will upset people,  ignoring the last trend will ruin your product. Therefore, you need to study your pattern before applying it. This trick will make the necessary tweaks without scaring off your users.

Myths and Realities of Replaced elements in HTML

Replaced Elements in HTML Myths and Realities - YWF (2)

According to official specs, replaced elements are content outside the scope of the CSS formatting model, such as an image, embedded document, or applet. For instance, the content of the HTML IMG element is often replaced by the image that its src attribute designates. Besides, replaced elements often have intrinsic dimensions, such as an intrinsic width, an intrinsic height, and an intrinsic height specified in absolute units. Now, you may have a general description of what a replaced element is, but as a web developer, you have to look deeper about replaced elements.

Replaced Elements in the Real World
To discuss in a full description about the replaced elements, we need to go to a different resource, namely the Rendering section of the HTML Living Standard document. But, when you look deeper, the specs can be confusing. This is because some HTML elements operate as replaced elements all the time, while other do it only in specific circumstances.

Embedded Content
Embedded content is the first category of replaced elements. Embedded content means any element that imports another resource into the document, or content from another vocabulary that is inserted into the document. While these external resources have the intrinsic dimensions that match the requirements of the definition.

Embed, iframe, and video are the main elements in this category. Since they always import external content into your document, these elements are always treated as replaced elements. There are more elements that a bit more complicated that fall into this category only in special circumstances, such as:

  • applet – Treated as a replaced element when it represents a plugin, otherwise it’s treated as an ordinary element.
  • audio – Treated as a replaced element only when it is “exposing a user interface element”. Will render about one line high, as wide as is necessary to expose the user agent’s user interface features.
  • object – Treated as a replaced element when it represents an image, plugin, or nested browsing context (similar to an iframe).
  • canvas – Treated as a replaced element when it represents embedded content. That is, it contains the element’s bitmap, if any, or else a transparent black bitmap with the same intrinsic dimensions as the element.

Images
Images are others elements that treated as a replaced element with the intrinsic dimensions of the image. This category also includes the input elements with a type=”image” attribute.

When the image is not rendered on the page, things get a bit more complicated for several reasons. The <input type=”image”> will be displayed as a normal button.

Default Size of Replaced Elements
We can understand this elements by these three basic rules:

  • if the object has explicit width, height and ratio values, use them;
  • if the object only has ratio, use auto for both width and height while maintaining the said ratio;
  • if none of these dimensions are available:
    – use width: 300px; height: 150px when the viewport is larger than 300px
    – use “auto” for both width and height and a ratio of 2:1 when the viewport is smaller than 300px;

What About the Other Types of Form Controls?
There are many misconceptions about other types of form controls are replaced elements too. After all, these elements are also rendered with a default width and height. In fact, most people consider intrinsic dimensions actually comes from the following line:

Each kind of form control is also described in the widgets section, which describes the look and feel of the control. Another reason why form control looks different from one browser to the next and from one OS to another:

The elements defined in this section can be rendered in a variety of manners, within the guidelines provided below. User agents are encouraged to set the ‘appearance’ CSS property appropriately to achieve platform-native appearances for widgets, and are expected to implement any relevant animations,etc, that are appropriate for the platform.

Conclusion
It is easy to get confused about replaced elements and form controls. But, they are different categories of HTML elements, with <input type=”image”> being the only form control that is a replaced element.

 

What’s rel=”noopener” in WordPress & How to Remove It

wordpress

When you upgrade your WordPress to 4.7.4 version or newer, you will notice a new tag rel=”noopener”. It is located alongside the target=”_blank” tag in the HTML editor. When you make them open in a new tab, the tag is automatically added to all internal and external links.

As a web developer, you may be wondering what this tag does? Does it affect your websites negatively in any way? So, in this article we will discuss what is rel=”noopener” in WordPress and how to remove it. If you curious about rel=”noopener”, you better check this out!

What is rel=”noopener”?
Even though, it may sound a bit suspicious, but it is actually a security fix that prevent malicious links from taking control over an opened tab. Usually, window.opener Javascript object is used to control a parent window using a child window. With this feature, hackers can switch user’s currently opened website with a fake one and steal information, such as login details. Therefore, to prevent this, rel=”noopener” blocks the use of the window.opener Javascript object. If window.opener does not work, then a tab can’t control another tab.

In fact, on 23rd November 2016, this security fix was added in TinyMCE plugin. Actually, WordPress uses TinyMCE as its text editor; it also got updated with this feature in WordPress version 4.7.4.

Is It Bad for your Website?
You may relieve as it doesn’t have any bad impact to your site. Some WordPress users may be making all internal and external links “nofollow”, which cause bad score for SEO. But, the fact is rel=”noopener”is just an instruction for the user’s browser to cease the use of the window.opener Javascript object.

This is because SEO relates to search engines and they don’t interact with rel=”noopener” tag. It works the same for analytics software that completely ignores this tag.

At first, this might have been a bit of a problem when WordPress added rel=”noopener noreferrer” tag before the fix was released with WordPress version 4.7.4. In the older version, “noreferrer” blocked the link from knowing where it actually came from.

Even though, it may not affect your SEO, but it may affect some of the analytics tools and affiliate programs. However, in WordPress latest version, “noreferrer” tag has been removed , so you should have no problem with rel=”noopener” tag. SYou only need to make sure you have updated to the latest version of WordPress.

How to remove rel=”noopener”
As it is stated above, rel=”noopener” doesn’t affect SEO. It also has no impact on analytics tools, and affiliate links also won’t break. It works to protect your users from any potential malicious links that could hijack their tabs. In fact, it only will stop when you want to use the window.opener Javascript object for any purpose.

As it is integrated into the WordPress text editor, removing rel=”noopener”can be a bit difficult. Moreover, it will be added back again when you save the document, Even if you manually remove it from the HTML code. So, the best solution is to disable this feature from the TinyMCE plugin itself.

However, you may need to add some lines of code in the functions.php file of your WordPress theme. In the functions.php file, copy and paste the below mentioned code and save it:

// Note that this intentionally disables a tinyMCE security feature.
// Use of this code is NOT

recommended.add_filter(‘tiny_mce_before_init’,’tinymce_allow_unsafe_link_target’);

function tinymce_allow_unsafe_link_target( $mceInit ) {
    $mceInit[‘allow_unsafe_link_target’]=true;
    return $mceInit;
}

This will stop WordPress from automatically adding rel=”noopener” tag in your posts. But, you may need to mannually remove the added tags from posts saved after WordPress 4.7.4 update.

 

In Summary
Even though, it may sound suspicious but you have nothing to be afraid of on the rel=”noopener’ tag. It will secure your website visitors. But, you should embrace this new edition of security feature, if you want to use the window.opener feature.