Tag Archives: website designer

The 4 Most Used Programming Languages

The-4-Most-Used-programming-languages_ywf

Nowadays, software developers are in high demand. This makes good developers are hard to find, yet they have the luxury of choosing from more than one job offer. So, what makes a ‘good developer’? A good developer should at least know some of the following skills. If you wish to become a good web developer, make sure you have mastered below skills.

  1. C#

C# is designed to be relatively easy and straightforward which makes it incredibly popular among developers and employers alike. C# is primarily used to develop web, mobile and enterprise applications while supporting imperative, functional and object-oriented paradigms.

Above all, there are two reasons why C# developers are terribly needed. First, it is because of its flexibility and usability. Second, it is firstly developed by Microsoft to build apps on the Microsoft platform.  So, it surely will fit in most common Microsoft IT infrastructure, which many companies have set in their system.

  1. PHP

PHP is another popular option; it’s an open source, server-side scripting language. In fact, PHP have powered millions of websites across the world, including high-profile sites such as Facebook and Wikipedia. Moreover, PHP is a language that is so popular that is used extensively in WordPress.

Over the years, PHP’s popularity has increased and there are no signs that this demand will slow down. That is why many companies will offer high salary for getting a good PHP talent.

  1. Java

Java is one of the oldest language programs that are favorable among developers. Because it is relatively easy and versatile, Java has become an attractive proposition for corporations and developers. Besides, it has many users, many existing applications and such a vast ecosystem.

Furthermore, Java is a stable language which makes the job market shows sustained hunger for developers in this field.

  1. JavaScript

Another language program that has gained everlasting popularity is JavaScript. It’s a versatile, object-orientated programming language that is built into most major browsers, including Firefox and Safari. Even though, JavaScript has been around for years but it can manage to hold its own against the existence of so many new languages. In fact, many regard it as one of the need –to-know language to help further a career. With so many developers have acquired this language, you need to double your work to stand out from the crowd.

5 UI Choices that Damage UX

7 UI Choices That Damage UX-01

User experience is one of the most important factors from every product and UI has become one of the elements that can determine great UX. However, not all UI are great for UX as some UI will bring bad effects for your UX. Yet there are still so many websites that push certain design trends which actually cause negative UX. Some web designers may not understand that some UI may be bad, but some may do it on purpose. So, if you don’t know which kinds of UI that is good or bad for your UX, you better read several points below.

  1. Unwanted Modals
    The idea of a modal window is a smart concept. It allows developers add concept over the page without the need to open a new tab. But the real problem is the unwanted modals not the modal windows for they always drag down the user experience. In fact, you can find three different types of “unwanted” modal popups:
  • Exit intents which open when the user’s mouse leaves the page body, usually hovering the browser tab,
  • Timed modals that open after a set amount of seconds;
  • Scroll modals that open after the user scrolls a certain distance down the page.

From the above information, you need to re-think whether it’s worth it to apply an unwanted modal popup to your website. For it will annoy your users to get a higher conversion rate. But these unwanted messages also give modals a bad name, which is tough because they serve a real purpose in UI design. These can be used wisely, like with modal signup fields or information-based modals triggered from a user’s mouse click. Or you can make it annoying by just make it appear from out of nowhere.

  1. Guilt in Copywriting
    Guilt copywriting which appeared in modals had become a trend for years ago. This kind of copywriting annoys users but increase signups. You can find this type of copywriting in many sites. In fact, this writing can also appear in sidebar fields or in-content opt-in forms. This copywriting will make you feel guilt instantly as you close the window. For example, the subscribe button looks ordinary, but the cancel button might read “No thanks, design is not my hobby”. This strategy might work well from a marketer’s standpoint, but certainly holds little value from a UX standpoint.
  1. Slide-In Ads/Offers
    Sometimes in web you will find a small box slide into view from the side. This box is usually a feedback box for user testing, or it might be social sharing links or even a discount promotion. This is a good idea to get user’s feedback. But just don’t use it too much, at least 2 different slide-in boxes on either side of the page, not 3 or more.
  1. Nav Menus Without Padding
    Navigation menu in every site usually has padding around them. But, you’ll find that some padding isn’t clickable unless you click on the exact block area of the text itself. You need to take 30 seconds to move CSS padding from a link’s container element to the link itself. Even though, the navigation is still the same, but now users can click the link and the space around the link.
  1. Paginated Listicles
    Another UI design which can damage your UX is content with one-item-per-page listicles. This is because few persons will enjoy clicking the “next” button constantly to read through a clickbait post. Unfortunately, there are many websites that use this kind of UI. It is mostly about page views and ad revenue more than anything else. So, it needs not only the work of designer but also the work of webmasters to prevent any multi-paged articles.

5 Key Principles of User Centered Design

Centered Design

User-centered design (UCD) process outlines the phases throughout a design and development life-cycle all while focusing on gaining a deep understanding of who will be using the product. This method has been widely acknowledged among so many web designers nowadays. But, not many understand the key principles behind user centered design. Here are 3 basic principles of user centered design that you surely won’t miss it!

  1. Use Simple and Natural Dialogue

It is important to create a natural sequence dialogue between user and system. Therefore, provide no unnecessary information to the user. In fact, irrelevant information will add complexity to the dialogue and in the end confusing the user. Bear in mind to use plain English and should use the vocabulary of the intended audience. Hence, terminology should be defined so that the same term always has the same meaning

  1.  Provide Adequate Feedback

Your users should be confident that their actions will be successful. For example, you can display a progress or working indicator when your users waiting for completion. This indicator will give the user a confidence that the computer is still operating.

Moreover, you also have to provide several levels of interaction. To show feedback at a low-level, you should give confirmation which tell that a control have been operated successfully.

  1. Provide Adequate Navigation Mechanisms

Users should have enough relevant information about where they are. To produce this information, you should apply a meaningful and consistent mechanism for assigning titles to windows. Then, use range and location indicators such as scroll bars or page numbers. You can also create navigation map, overview, or history of areas visited. Make your users feel more convenient in navigating the different windows in your web. You can create routes to access for particular tasks to achieve this goal. Furthermore, you should create an “emergency exit”. This will enable your users to escape from any unwanted state without having to go through an extended dialogue. For instance, undo facility or cancel button.

  1. Present Information Clearly

Increase the user’s ability to discriminate between different items and groups of data. Arranging on-screen information by the use of spacing, boxes, and visual coding techniques. But, don’t burden users with lots of information or coding than is necessary when performing the task. To enhance learn ability, you should be consistent in presenting information and location across different windows.

  1. Reduce Errors

Guiding the user to find their correct path to accomplish their goal will reduce errors. Users’ responses should be constrained to avoid error where appropriate to the task. But not where this would limit the users’ reasonable choice in how to perform their tasks. Similarly, the system should validate data entry as near to the point of input as possible.

Moreover, you should also use plain language avoiding the use of codes, indicate precisely the problem. Then, you should suggest a solution in error messages. But, above all, avoid using words that would blame the users.