Tag Archives: social media

Design Archetypes: Why Leaning into Familiarity is a Virtue in Web Development

web development tips

In life, we’re frequently told and advised to just be ourselves, to not constantly cater to what society expect of you and just focus on what brings you joy. For the most part, this is not actually a bad advice but let me remind you that this kind of thinking is what led Ted Bundy into becoming Ted Bundy and sometimes, fitting in is your best course of action. The unknown might be exciting at times but they can be equally disheartening and this is why in the world of web development, it’s not exactly a bad idea to lean in to the concept of familiarity every now and then.

As an analogy, look into some of the biggest films in 2019 and you’ll start to see a pattern. We have the updated, live-action version of Disney classics such as The Lion King and Aladdin, the final entry in Star Wars third trilogy, and a Terminator sequel that brings back some of of the more notable characters from the earlier films. As much as we clamor for the new and exciting, we are naturally drawn to what’s familiar and this is something you can always take advantage of in web development.

Staying in our comfort zone

The common adage is that familiarity breeds contempt, that the longer you comes into contact with something, the less respect of affinity you’re going to have for that particular thing. Honestly, I would very much like to call hogwash on that particular adage. I’ve been regularly playing Pokémon games since the very first one came out in 1998 and even after two decades, I’ve always eagerly anticipated the latest video games. Because of how the games have largely stuck the same formula, I know what I’m going to get with Pokémon but instead of diminishing my interest, it has instead raised my anticipation because I know I’m going to have a good time.

The phrase staying in the comfort zone tends to carry a negative stigma because it implies a lack of a sense of adventure and an inherent conservative attitude but there’s virtue in sticking to your lane. Being open to new ideas but if you’re confident in what works, why fix what isn’t broken? Trying to engage in something novel and a desire to innovate can sometimes lead to unreasonable expectations and that can be particularly damaging as the potential for disappointment would be high.

Setting you up for failure

When you promise something new and exciting to the general public, you’re basically setting yourself into having to fulfill two different goals; that the public is willing to adapt to whatever you bring to the table and what you’re bringing is an improvement to what’s currently out there. The first one can be especially hard and typically, it’s the kind of thing that only companies that have accumulated a lot of goodwill can safely navigate. There are plenty of real world examples of the difficulty in being a trailblazer.

In a conversation of when online video gaming first appeared on consoles, Microsoft’s Xbox Live that launched in 2002 is frequently cited as the starting point when in fact; it was Sega’s Dreamcast that first had the audacity to start the trend in the late 90s. Despite the critical acclaim received by games like Phantasy Star Online, which has been frequently cited as a landmark title in the history of video game, the console market as a whole didn’t warm up to online games until Microsoft took the baton.

Forcing the public to adapt to your ways isn’t always a good idea

Whenever I boot up a new Pokémon game for the first time, I always know what I’m going to get. It always comes down to the choice between three starter Pokémons, a limit of four moves per Pokémons and a limit of six Pokémons at any given moment. There are 8 gym leaders across the region I have to beat before I could enter the Pokémon League in which I have to battle the Elite Four and the region’s champion and hundreds of Pokémons to catch and train. Thanks to my familiarity with the system, there’s only a small learning curve and this is why familiarity can be such as powerful tool in the world of web development.

In websites, usability has always been an important factor. With so much competition and so little in terms of attention span, you can’t risk having a website that has a steep learning curve as that could easily push away potential customers as they look for an easier website to navigate. Best practices and generally accepted standards exist for a reason and it’s easy to overlook what is familiar in search of the exceptional as designers focus on what they think look best instead of putting the focus on users.

Falling back on design archetypes isn’t a sin

For the more creative designers, relying on archetypes tends to be strictly verboten but trust me when I say that those archetypes exist for a reason; they tend to work. Radical reinvention is a risky bet and 90% of the time, it’s better to use archetypes as a starting point and focus in improving them one step at a time. I’m not saying that thinking outside the box isn’t useful but that’s the kind of advice that could only work when you have the necessary resource to back it up, something that might be too out of reach for small businesses.

The Access to Success: The Complete Guide to Understanding Mobile Commerce

content marketing tips

Phew, I am kind of proud of myself for my self-control because I didn’t just spend money recklessly this month. Yes, all these online shops just can’t leave me alone and I sometimes curse myself for letting my guard down. Back then I used to be so lazy to shop because I had to get ready first and go to the mall, looking at people, crowds and many things I didn’t want to see as an introverted person. Now, I can literally buy anything I want in a flash, straight from my phone. The lesson from this is that we know how powerful ecommerce in this day and age. As time goes by, the inventors are trying to make things easier for us – shopping included. That being said, 2019 is also the year of changes and new stuff. Yes, it’s more like mobile commerce instead of just ecommerce. What’s the difference, actually? On the surface, ecommerce and mobile commerce are virtually identical. The former means selling products over the internet via desktop or laptop computers. The latter means doing exactly the same – but through handheld devices like smartphones or tablets. Ecommerce may focus on a company’s online store, while mobile commerce targets people who shop straight from their phone. Customers shop from brands and retailers through several channels on their phones, including social media, mobile commerce apps, mobile websites and many more. Why? It’s simple; shopping through your phone is easier and you can do it anytime and anywhere. For that reason, big shopping brands like Sephora, Zalora, etc. have started using mobile apps to ease transactions.

If you are a new business owner looking to start mobile commerce business, I know it can be hard sometimes knowing the competition between mobile commerce has been vastly strong nowadays. As a person who provides content marketing services, I have been helping clients get over their fear of starting out because of the tight competition between them and their competitors. Yes, nowadays the rise of mobile commerce is inevitable and the competition is rising high as well. Don’t worry; I’m going to guide you to the access to success through mobile commerce with this article. Keep reading to find out!

Before we start with the guide, let’s talk about benefits of mobile commerce from user perspective first so you can grasp the essential knowledge of mobile commerce. Here they are:

  • Easy transaction anytime and anywhere
  • Additional discounts if ordered from the app
  • New app member benefits
  • Easier access to products
  • Faster loading time

Now that you know the benefits from user perspective, let’s move to the types of mobile commerce. Mobile commerce is not just limited to buying and selling goods through mobile-specific channels. There are other ways you can make use of mobile commerce application, such as:

  • Mobile bookings: Now we don’t have to go to the train station to get tickets anymore. We can just book straight from our phone. All types of bookings like plane tickets, hotels, trains, etc. are available through mobile commerce
  • App-specific marketing and discounts: Perhaps Starbucks is the perfect example for this specific marketing strategy where LINE users can get a buy 1 get 1 promo by showing a specific message they get from Starbucks official LINE ID denoting a buy 1 get 1 promo to the cashier. Yes, this is something that can only be done through mobile commerce.
  • Mobile banking: Going to the ATMs is tiring enough if you only need to send money, right? Mobile banking provides solutions to send money anytime and anywhere you go, unless you are in need of cash, though.
  • Mobile payments: Why do you need cash when you can pay it straight from your phone? With a cashback, no less! People are basically cashless, right now.

So, how do we get started with mobile commerce?

Optimise your mobile commerce site or app

You may have different kinds of marketing strategies and plans, but if your business mobile app or site is not user friendly, no one will end up buying from you. According to research on Google, more than 60% of mobile users will quickly abandon a mobile site or uninstall an app if it’s glitchy or hard to use. Your mobile commerce presence needs to designed and coded for different devices, platforms, and browsers to ensure that end users get a seamless experience.

Use responsive design

I remember the first time I accessed a website through my mobile phone, where there was no laptop and only PC at home while I was on my way to a mall. It was such a bad experience that I couldn’t help going straight to home after that to access my PC so that I could buy something. Why was it such a bad experience? It was because the site was not adjusted to my mobile device size and it ended up ‘freezing’ the whole screen. It’s a good thing that now we can access any site from any device because of the rise of responsive design in this day and age. Responsive design is a design approach to adjust a site size to the size of any device so that the site can be accessed by any device. If your mobile commerce company knows this approach, implement it immediately or your visitor will lose interest in your mobile app or mobile site.

Make it simple for the users

Sure, unique design may attract the eyes of your visitors, but as soon as they find it difficult to access your mobile app or mobile site, or your mobile app or mobile site is hard to understand, they will lose interest already and leave it. Therefore, make it unique but make it simple as well. Use clear and easy navigation so that users can understand where they go and what they should do.

That’s how you understand mobile commerce. In the end, how successful a business is depends on how persistent we are. If you are afraid to take risks, then having a business is not for you, because starting a business needs courage and determination to succeed and that includes taking some risks. If you are ready to start mobile commerce, you can contact us now and let our team help you.

Functional Simplicity: The Various Ways Minimalism Can Enhance Customer Experience

web design tips

Simplify, then add lightness. This one core philosophy is the foundation of Colin Chapman’s approach in building cars in the 50s all the way until his death in the early 80s. Even now, you can still see this philosophy mirrored in Lotus Cars, the British automotive company that Chapman founded that you might’ve recognized from classic James Bond films. Even before minimalism become fashionable, Chapman has always adhered to this philosophy, even when it sometimes jeopardized the safety of drivers driving his cars.

For Chapman, minimalism isn’t just an aesthetic choice. Another one of his famous quotes exemplify his line of thinking; “Adding power makes you faster on the straights; subtracting weight makes you faster everywhere”. As is the case with the automotive world, minimalism also carries actual functions aside from just being nice to look at when it comes to the world of Melbourne web designer. The word basic tends to have pejorative undertones in our current discourse but simplicity does have its values when it comes to designing a user interface.

Minimalism as a design language

There is no universal agreement on what would constitute minimalist design but the oft-cited consensus is that it represents a school of thought where every element in an interface is there for a specific purpose. In minimalism, there’s a deliberate reason behind the existence and placement of every element in a single web page and in the eyes of the users, everything works exactly the way they think it would. Ideally, there are no superfluous elements in minimalism and the experience is pared down to only focus on what’s essential.

This is not to say that there can be no intricate, complex or any kind of visual touch in a minimalist design; it’s more about how these elements shouldn’t be made more intricate, complex or distracting than they already are. Functionally and aesthetically, the goal in minimalism is to prioritize efficiency, how a designer can do and convey more with less. This less is more approach doesn’t just infuse your website with a tidy look, it would also enhance your customer experience in several tangible and noticeable ways.

Minimalism helps add clarity to your website and/or contents

It doesn’t matter if your website serves an educational or a marketing purpose; you would still want your message to be success fully delivered to your audience and one easy way of achieving that is by adopting minimalism as a design language. Minimalism means having less things to focus on for the users, enabling them to navigate their way around your website and digesting your contents easier. The challenge here lies in your ability to distill your message to its essentials while still being unambiguous.

Far too often, designers commit the sin of pulling too hard and too much to the other direction. They not only succeed on stripping down their elements of any superfluous elements, they also succeed in making them almost unrecognizable. Having to manage this delicate balance can be hard as there’s a very fine line between a minimalist design and a muddled, ambiguous design. If you’re just starting out, you might not be able to achieve this balance in your first try but dig your heels in and I can assure you that the result would be more than worth the trouble.

Minimalism helps with the performance of your website

Just at look at how much success Colin Chapman has had in Formula 1, the Holy Grail when it comes to motorsport. Under his leadership, Team Lotus won a total of seven Constructor’s Championship titles. That’s enough to place Lotus in fourth place in the all-time list, which is quite impressive given it’s been two decades since the last time Lotus entered a Formula 1 race. Obviously, motorsport and web design is far from an apple-to-apple comparison but lightness does carry several inherent performance advantages in the world of web design.

On the users’ part, adopting minimalism as a design language helps make your website load faster and perform better simply because there are fewer elements that have to be loaded. Having less complicated elements means that your website wouldn’t be such a resource hog either, making it easy for users that are using modest hardware in both desktop and mobile. On the designers’ part, minimalism would make maintenance and upkeep easier as again; there would simple be fewer elements you have to take care of.

Minimalism helps make organization and housekeeping easier

For business that runs an online service and have to resort to using highly sophisticated and complex web applications that have to either process or host a lot of data, adopting minimalism as a design language can help make all of that sophistication and complexity more digestible. Even if your target audience skews younger, it’s wrong to assume that all millenials and Generation Zs are all equally tech-savvy; some would still be just as clueless as your grandparents when faced with a highly technical application.

As has been mentioned before, minimalism helps add clarity to your user interface. White space, another essential element in minimalism, could also help make the complex nature of web application more manageable by injecting a visual breathing space on your interface. Given the sheer popularity of web applications, ranging from office productivity apps, music streaming apps and e-commerce platforms, web designers have to come up with a way so that they can be easily used by everyone and minimalist design is one way of achieving this.