Tag Archives: content

Myths and Realities of Replaced elements in HTML

Replaced Elements in HTML Myths and Realities - YWF (2)

According to official specs, replaced elements are content outside the scope of the CSS formatting model, such as an image, embedded document, or applet. For instance, the content of the HTML IMG element is often replaced by the image that its src attribute designates. Besides, replaced elements often have intrinsic dimensions, such as an intrinsic width, an intrinsic height, and an intrinsic height specified in absolute units. Now, you may have a general description of what a replaced element is, but as a web developer, you have to look deeper about replaced elements.

Replaced Elements in the Real World
To discuss in a full description about the replaced elements, we need to go to a different resource, namely the Rendering section of the HTML Living Standard document. But, when you look deeper, the specs can be confusing. This is because some HTML elements operate as replaced elements all the time, while other do it only in specific circumstances.

Embedded Content
Embedded content is the first category of replaced elements. Embedded content means any element that imports another resource into the document, or content from another vocabulary that is inserted into the document. While these external resources have the intrinsic dimensions that match the requirements of the definition.

Embed, iframe, and video are the main elements in this category. Since they always import external content into your document, these elements are always treated as replaced elements. There are more elements that a bit more complicated that fall into this category only in special circumstances, such as:

  • applet – Treated as a replaced element when it represents a plugin, otherwise it’s treated as an ordinary element.
  • audio – Treated as a replaced element only when it is “exposing a user interface element”. Will render about one line high, as wide as is necessary to expose the user agent’s user interface features.
  • object – Treated as a replaced element when it represents an image, plugin, or nested browsing context (similar to an iframe).
  • canvas – Treated as a replaced element when it represents embedded content. That is, it contains the element’s bitmap, if any, or else a transparent black bitmap with the same intrinsic dimensions as the element.

Images
Images are others elements that treated as a replaced element with the intrinsic dimensions of the image. This category also includes the input elements with a type=”image” attribute.

When the image is not rendered on the page, things get a bit more complicated for several reasons. The <input type=”image”> will be displayed as a normal button.

Default Size of Replaced Elements
We can understand this elements by these three basic rules:

  • if the object has explicit width, height and ratio values, use them;
  • if the object only has ratio, use auto for both width and height while maintaining the said ratio;
  • if none of these dimensions are available:
    – use width: 300px; height: 150px when the viewport is larger than 300px
    – use “auto” for both width and height and a ratio of 2:1 when the viewport is smaller than 300px;

What About the Other Types of Form Controls?
There are many misconceptions about other types of form controls are replaced elements too. After all, these elements are also rendered with a default width and height. In fact, most people consider intrinsic dimensions actually comes from the following line:

Each kind of form control is also described in the widgets section, which describes the look and feel of the control. Another reason why form control looks different from one browser to the next and from one OS to another:

The elements defined in this section can be rendered in a variety of manners, within the guidelines provided below. User agents are encouraged to set the ‘appearance’ CSS property appropriately to achieve platform-native appearances for widgets, and are expected to implement any relevant animations,etc, that are appropriate for the platform.

Conclusion
It is easy to get confused about replaced elements and form controls. But, they are different categories of HTML elements, with <input type=”image”> being the only form control that is a replaced element.

 

Make More Sales with Social Selling

How to Use Content Marketing to Generate Social Sales_YWF

Generating sales is the ultimate goal of all marketing. So, marketers should put their best effort. One of the ways is by promoting content marketing that can help you increase revenue. But, don’t you know that you can also leverage your content for social selling? Besides, one study found that social selling report a year-over-year sales growth. If you are interested to know more detail information about social selling, you can continue to read this article.

What is Social Selling?
Social selling is interpreted as using social media the way it was supposed to be used: being social. This technique is usually used by many SEO services to leverage the amount of real buyer. For instance, you provide useful content, answer questions, and have conversations with prospects. Furthermore, you should have one main goal: getting your potential customers to respond to your efforts. You can start your social selling by getting them to comment on a status update or reply to a post. Over the long run, this act will turn into getting them to respond to an email or schedule a call.

How to Use Content Marketing to Generate Social Sales
There’s no better example of the selling power of blogging than great content. The main idea is to answer the most common question in your social media customer service responses. Remember that you should provide solutions to their problems, not just push those articles out on social media.

What Kind of Content Helps with Social Selling?
Not every content can generate sales, but there are some content that can generate sales, such as:

  • How-to guides for common problems in your industry
  • Useful FAQ pages
  • Explainer content about how to use your product or service
  • Video content
  • Webinars
  • Shocking or surprising information that gets people to take action.

What to Do After You Generate Traffic
You understand how to use content and social media to generate traffic. Now it’s time to turn these leads into sales. It starts by understanding more about your leads. Google Analytics is great. But, it doesn’t reveal enough information about your individual prospects to help you nurture a relationship with them.

Enhance Your Analytics for Easier Outreach
You can install Lead feeder to enhance your social selling. It works on top of Google’s tools to reveal data related to your site’s anonymous visitors. Lead feeder will actually show you which companies your website visitors work for. To determine what offices they’re browsing from, it uses their IP addresses. You’ll get a lot more info about the company, including a list of LinkedIn connections you have that are associated with that company.

Moreover, it tracks which pages your anonymous audience members look at, which can help you segment them. Then, it automatically pushes this data to your CRM, where you can sort them by quality, regency, and other factors. As a result, you’ll get better insight into the traffic you’re already getting. So, you can follow with targeted outreach messaging via your social channels and land more clients.

Get Maximum Conversions by Setting Up your Content
Our main goal is not only driving traffic, but also to get more info about your visitors. Then, make sure that they will come back. That’s why it’s important to have strong, highly-relevant calls to action within your content. Using a simple “subscribe to get our updates” won’t cut it. You need to offer something better.

Email Outreach to Enhance Your Social Selling
When you get your visitor’s contact info, it’s time to make a deal. And the best way to reach them is via email or social media. This can be a good way to interact with them. Also, get them on the phone, or even lead them directly to a sales page on your website.

Summary
Both social selling and content marketing are the epitome of digital marketing. So, if  you can combine the two, you can drive traffic like crazy and turn them into prospective buyers.

3 Techniques on How to Optimize Your Website for Multiple Keywords

How-to-Optimize-Your-Website-for-Multiple-Keywords

With so many updates, nowadays SEO puts more priority on context. This makes context is above keywords. But, this doesn’t mean that you will neglect keywords relevancy and authority. Therefore, as a SEO engineer who works for SEO service, you have to understand and combine what Google wants and what users want.

If you assume that Google will understand the context of your content while you build a strong brand and positive user experience, you will still have to consider about the hierarchy of your content, how to organize it, and how to build context that can rank for multiple keywords, so that it will meet your conversion goals. Below are several tips on how to optimize and focus on keywords.

  1. Know Your Current Content

After determining your conversion goals, you may need to set your analytics house, and conducted keyword research, then you’re ready to organize your keyword data into meaningful topics. Instead of stemming or use all of the literal variations of the terms and its plural or singular versions, you can find sets of terms on the same topic and group them together.

Usually we often fall into the most general topics of the niche or industry when running an e-commerce site. Most B2B sites follow a pattern as well with top-level business industry terms, product or service categories and the products or service themselves.

As keywords grouped into topics, so it is possible to take the important next step of mapping your keywords to existing pages of content or conducting a content audit. As the first step you can run a crawl of the existing site structure with screaming Frog, download the HTML page results into Excel, and then get to work putting topics and terms out to the side of specific pages.

When you know you have content gaps and need to create more, that’s when you can turn around and quickly search to see which websites own the top of the SERPs for those topics and draw inspiration (without copying them) for ways to fill the gaps with your own content and draw inspiration for ways to fill the gaps with your own content and make decisions based on priority.

  1. Optimize Site Architecture

Even though, you can start once you know where you stand with content, then having a plan for filling gaps but first you need to figure out how to organize the content. This means balancing user experience, with product/service offerings and topical keyword search volume. Moreover, build out your site hierarchy working top to bottom going from most general to most specific. Even though, mostly sites are already built this way. However, site navigation and structure is often dictated by an internal or organizational view when SEO isn’t involved.

Besides, you are able to cast a wider net in terms of rankings and visibility, by taking an approach that looks at essentially any page at any level on the site as an entrance point and landing page for one or more topical keywords. In fact, all of your efforts will destruct your message, when you try to rank for too many terms with a single page or section of the site.

  1. Do Your On-Page Optimization

It is surprising that there are so many SEO campaigns that neglected the basics of on-page optimization. In fact, these SEO basics still apply. However, you need to look at it deeper than just trying to merely produce content and organize it well top to bottom in the site. Besides, you need to ensure proper categorization, when you’re building context for the user and Google. Another power in the on-page variables is having all factors working together with architecture and on-page optimization.